Can a local authority mediate a parking dispute between neighbours? | Lawhive - Solicitors & Lawyers Online
Can a local authority mediate a parking dispute between neighbours?
I rent a small cottage in a little village in Norfolk. My house is about 10 yards off the main road, and in between my house and the road is a gravel entryway that runs in between two other houses that are on the road. The tenant of one of these houses sometimes parks their car on the gravel spot, but since I moved in about six months ago it's never been clear if they are allowed do to this or not. My landlord has told me they are not, because access should be maintained and in theory I should be able to drive my car over the gravel bit and park my car in front of my house. But the tenants of that property have just moved out and today the agent was showing people around and telling them they could park there because my property only has 'pedestrian access.' I.e. I can walk around the car to get to my house (although this isn't always easy because it's quite narrow and we all keep our bins against one wall). My question is, is there a local authority we can all go to to get this dispute resolved, or would we have to hire solicitors? The problem is that my landlord only has one property, the one I'm in, whereas the other is run by a big estate agents, so I really feel on the back foot.

Donna Massey

19th October 2021

+5

8 upvotes

Top Answer
First review the deeds for all the houses ( you can download these for £3 each) this will answer who owns what and what rights everyone has to that land

William Cephas

11th February 2022

+6

9 upvotes

Who owns the gravel driveway? From the sound of it, it's the other house. This is all to do with easements and rights of way. The question will be, do you only have a pedestrian right of way, or do you have a vehicular right of way? Whatever it is should be written in the deeds. Is your parking spot actually owned by your house?

Joyce Bragg

11th February 2022

+2

5 upvotes

If there are written clauses and covenants regarding the area of the gravel strip and the access rights on and through it they should be in the deeds to the individual properties. Your landlord should have a copy of these for your cottage. In our 2014 built house the clauses are very clear about what you can and can't do with the shared access walkway at the side of our drive. The clauses basically say our property owns it but "y and z properties" have access over it and nobody can obstruct it at all. If there are no covenants or clauses related to the area in any of the properties deeds then whichever property owns the land (this should obviously be detailed on the plan for the property that owns it) has sole right to use it as they please and do with it as they see fit.

Madeline Mccarthy

11th February 2022

2 upvotes

This page contains user-generated content and is provided for general informational use only. Unless otherwise indicated, answers are provided by non-qualified (NQ) lay members of the public. Please read our Terms for more information.

If you have feedback on this question please contact support@lawhive.co.uk

Get legal help the hassle-free way

We have expert solicitors ready to resolve any type of legal issue in the UK.

Remove the uncertainty and hassle by letting our solicitors do the heavy lifting for you.

Get Legal Help

Takes less than 5 mins