Can a person be blocked on social media if there is a court order in place for the other person to have access to the child? | Lawhive - Solicitors & Lawyers Online
Can a person be blocked on social media if there is a court order in place for the other person to have access to the child?
Good morning, im hoping someone maybe able to clear something up for me please? My ex whom i havent seen for about 8 1/2 yrs now keeps getting in touch via social media wanting to see our son. He had taken me to court 7 years ago but failed to show. There was a high level of dv and he hasnt seen our child since his 1st birthday. I have told him multiple times i am happy for him to see our son but would like it done through courts to safeguard our child (he has a unsavoury past/drug abuse) he has today contacted to say he is taking me to court for parental alienation. Due to the level of mental abuse i am now full of anxiety and worry, stomach is doing flips at him just messaging let alone what he has now accused me of. When i had my solicitor years ago she said i couldnt block him on social media as this would be making it look like im putting up a communication barrier. Does this still stand? Or could i block him on social media and it wouldnt go against me? Many thanks

Anonymous

9th April 2022

2 upvotes

Top Answer
NQ. Consider a parenting app for communicating. It retains all messages texts video etc and can be used for evidence by social workers, police, courts if required Tends to reduce abusive communicating!

Jeanette Martinez

9th April 2022

1 upvote

NQ - “Rather unhelpfully, there is no fixed or single definition of parental alienation. Broadly speaking, it’s the concept of a child rejecting a parent with whom they had previously had a positive relationship through no fault of that parent or the child and seemingly without reason.” Honestly, my advice now is have a brew & await any potential letters arriving. I highly doubt they will going off what you’ve said is his past record. My best opinion on the communication side is to advise one method of communicating & block everything else. Something you have record of easily, such as emails which aren’t held to one device & are time/date stamped.

David Carroll

9th April 2022

+2

5 upvotes

NQ Law Student. If he is seeking contact, have you considered suggesting and trying a self referral to a contact centre - the NACCC, for instance? As for any parental alienation case against you, he'd have a tough time proving his case if the last time he saw the child was when they were 1. It would be his responsibility to prove, on the balance of probability, that you have intentionally caused your child to have an unjustly negative view of him to the point that it negatively affects their relationship - or something to that effect. In short, simply being an absent father does not mean that the child's mother is guilty of parental alienation. Your request that appropriate safeguards are put in place, given the history here, is not only reasonable under the circumstances, but also your legal responsibility as the mother of the child.

Brian Dean

9th April 2022

2 upvotes

Solicitor. I would give him every reasonable opportunity to come forward with a plan of careful re-introduction into your son's life with safeguards in place. Give him a timescale and warn him not to contact you via social media. Perhaps set up a fresh email account just for communicating on this and ensure he has this. Then if he continues to harass you through social media, block him as you have given him an alternative communication channel. If you feel any form of contact between child and dad would not be in the child's best interests then inform your ex of this. It is then up to your ex to go through more formal channels such as through a solicitor and through court intervention.

Susanna Ruiz

9th April 2022

1 upvote

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